Asian Cuisine and Cooking Traditions Come to US

August 16th, 2011
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Asian cuisine involves much more than Chinese food, though Chinese food was one of the first Asian cuisines that Americans were introduced to, the techniques brought over by Chinese laborers hired to help build the railroads in the 19th century. Many Asian dishes, however, are simplified or altered for the American palate. One of the main reasons for this is that some ingredients, like galangal or lime leaves, are difficult to find in America. Dairy, carrots and tomatoes are rarely used in traditional Chinese cooking, and Americans might find ingredients like pig uteri off-putting.The whole story can be found at http://blog.foodservicewarehouse.com/blog/2010/06/23/the-future-of-american-flavors/

After the long dominance of Chinese cuisine, where it seems there’s a Chinese take-out place on every corner of every major American city, other Asian cuisines are becoming popular. A Japanese restaurant’s menu might feature sushi and tempura, vegetables, meat and fish dipped in batter and deep fried, and cold or hot noodle dishes in dashi, a seaweed broth. Kedegeree, an aromatic saffron rice, might be served at an Indian establishment, and a Vietnamese vegetable stir fry might be served with its famous Nuoac Mam sauce. Pork Pho is a Thai dish where cubes of pork are served in a broth with rice noodles and fragrant star anise.

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